[Fleabanes and Daisies: The Genus Erigeron East of the Cascade Mts. of Oregon and Washington]

Foothill Daisy, Longleaf Fleabane

Erigeron corymbosus

The photo above is a close-up of the flower head of foothill daisy as photographed along Wilson Creek, a BLM site several miles south of US Highway 2 in central Washington.........June 25, 2006.

The photo at right shows a close-up of the involucral bracts of foothill daisy as photographed along Wilson Creek in central Washington........June 25, 2006.
Characteristics:

Foothill daisy is an attactive perennial wildflower with a cluster of basal leaves and erect stems rising from 10-50 cm high. The stems are slender, usually purplish near the base, and often branched above. The herbage is usually densely covered with spreading hairs less than 1 mm in length. The leaves are linear to narrowly oblanceolate and distinctly 3-nerved. The basal leaves range from 5-20 cm long and taper to a slender petiole. The several stem leaves are much reduced in size.

The inflorescence includes one to sixteen flower daisy-like flower heads, each on long peduncles. The involucre is closely short-villous, 5-7 mm high, and has narrow, awl-shaped bracts. The 30-65 violet to white rays surround a yellowish central disk. Individual rays are 7-13 mm long.


Habitat:

Foothill daisy may be found in dry open woods and in the sagebrush plains.


Range:

Foothill daisy may be found from southern British Columbia south to the east of the Cascade Mts. to eastern Oregon and east to Montana and Wyoming.


The photo above shows a basal leaf of foothill daisy. Note the 3 main veins in the blade. Photographed at Wilson Creek, central Washington..........June 25, 2006.

A photo of the upper stem and leaves found there of foothill daisy.

- Foothill Daisy, Longleaf Fleabane: Erigeron corymbosus

The photo at left shows foothill daisy as seen in tall grasses amongst threetip sagebrush along Wilson Creek, a BLM site several miles south of US Highway 2 in central Washington...........June 25, 2006. The photo at right shows foothill daisy atop East Point at the eastern end of the Mount Pisgah ridgeline, Ochoco National Forest.........July 14, 2017.

Foothill Daisy, Longleaf Fleabane: Erigeron corymbosus

A close-up of the leaf blade with the distinctive three veins. Photographed in sagebrush uplands along the eastern shoreline of Banks Lake near the Million Dollar Boat Launch, Grant County, Washington..........June 2, 2013. Note the numerous spreading hairs along the leaf margin.

The basal leaves of foothill daisy as photographed along Forest Road 1675 approximately 100 meters east of Forest road 16, Malheur National Forest.........July 6, 2002. The three nerves in the leaf are faintly visible here.

The photo above is a close-up of the flower head of foothill daisy as photographed along Forest Road 1675 approximately 100 meters east of Forest road 16, Malheur National Forest.........July 6, 2002.

Foothill Daisy, Longleaf Fleabane: Erigeron corymbosus - Foothill Daisy, Longleaf Fleabane: Erigeron corymbosus

Flower head of Foothill Daisy, Longleaf Fleabane: Erigeron corymbosus - Involucral bracts of Foothill Daisy, Longleaf Fleabane: Erigeron corymbosus

An additional 4 photos of foothill daisy as seen on rimrock near Rimrock Lake, Moses Coulee, central Washington.........June 6, 2009.

Foothill Daisy, Longleaf Fleabane: Erigeron corymbosus - Basal leaves of Foothill Daisy, Longleaf Fleabane: Erigeron corymbosus

Foothill daisy as seen along the first mile of the Lake Creek Trail #378, Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.......July 19, 2013.

Paul Slichter