[The Hound's-tongues of Mt. Adams Country]

Common Hound's-tongue

Cynoglossum officinale

The photo above shows a close-up frontal view of the flower of common hound's-tongue as seen at about 3650' at the end of forest road #170 on the southwestern flanks of King Mt., several miles southeast of Mt. Adams itself...............July 17, 2005. Common hound's-tongue is a weedy species which often becomes distributed along roadsides and then eventually into clearcuts or other disturbed areas. At this point, this site is the only know location for this plant above 3500' on Mt. Adams, although there are probably numerous additional sites that it exists at.

The photo above shows a close-up sideview of the coiled inflorescence of common hound's-tongue as seen at about 3650' at the end of forest road #170 on the southwestern flanks of King Mt., several miles southeast of Mt. Adams itself...............July 17, 2005.

The photo above shows a close-up of the nutlets of common hound's-tongue as seen at about 3650' at the end of forest road #170 on the southwestern flanks of King Mt., several miles southeast of Mt. Adams itself...............July 17, 2005.

The photo above shows a close-up of the nutlets of common hound's-tongue as seen at about 3650' at the end of forest road #170 on the southwestern flanks of King Mt., several miles southeast of Mt. Adams itself...............July 17, 2005. Besides the color of the flowers, this species can be identified from the similar Pacific Hound's-tongue (Cynoglossum grande) of the Columbia River Gorge because the dorsal surface of the nutlets of C. officinale are flattened with raised edges, as seen on the upper-most nutlet, while the dorsal surface of C. grande is broadly rounded.

The photo above shows a close-up of the basal leaf of common hound's-tongue as seen at about 3650' at the end of forest road #170 on the southwestern flanks of King Mt., several miles southeast of Mt. Adams itself...............July 17, 2005.

The photo above shows the general form of this noxious weed as it intrudes upon the western boundary of Conboy National Wildlife Refuge along Laurel Lane at the southeastern foot of Mt. Adams....................June 18, 2006.

Paul Slichter