[Toadflaxes: The Genus Linaria East of the Cascade Mountains of Oregon and Washington]

Brown-leaved Toadflax, Dalmatian Toadflax

Linaria dalmatica ssp. dalmatica

Synonyms: Linaria genistifolia ssp. dalmatica, Linaria macedonica

Brown-leaved Toadflax, Dalmatian Toadflax: Linaria dalmatica ssp. dalmatica (Synonyms: Linaria genistifolia ssp. dalmatica, Linaria macedonica)

Dalmatian toadflax growing in gravel along Forest Road 16 in the Logan Valley, Malheur National Forest.........July 3, 2010.

Characteristics:

Dalmatian toad-flax is a perennial wildflower with erect, branched stems from 40-70 cm high arising from spreading horizontal roots. The herbage of the leaves and stems is glabrous and glaucous. The leaves alternate along the stems and are ovate to lance-ovate in shape with sessile, clasping bases. They range from 2-4 cm long and from 10-16 mm wide. They are palmately veined.

The inflorescence is an elongate raceme. The calyx is 5-7.5 mm long with subequal lobes. The yellow corolla is strongly two-lipped with the upper lip from 10-15 mm long and the lower lip from 5-11 mm long. The palate closes off the throat and is densely white-to orange-bearded. The long spur is 9-17 mm long while the rest of the corolla is 14-24 mm long.


Habitat:

Dalmatian toad-flax is found in disturbed, weedy places along roadsides and in disturbed fields.


Range:

Dalmatian toad-flax is an introduced species commonly found across the western United States. It is native to the Mediterranean region.


Close-up sideview of the flower of Brown-leaved Toadflax, Dalmatian Toadflax: Linaria dalmatica ssp. dalmatica (Synonyms: Linaria genistifolia ssp. dalmatica, Linaria macedonica) - Close-up ventral view of the flower of Brown-leaved Toadflax, Dalmatian Toadflax: Linaria dalmatica ssp. dalmatica (Synonyms: Linaria genistifolia ssp. dalmatica, Linaria macedonica) - Close-up view of the raceme of Brown-leaved Toadflax, Dalmatian Toadflax: Linaria dalmatica ssp. dalmatica (Synonyms: Linaria genistifolia ssp. dalmatica, Linaria macedonica)

Close-ups of the flowers and inflorescence of dalmatian toadflax as seen growing in gravel along Forest Road 16 in the Logan Valley, Malheur National Forest........July 3, 2010.

Paul Slichter