[The Genus Thelypodium East of the Cascade Mountains of Oregon and Washington]

Cut-leaf Thelypody, Thick-leaf Thelypody

Thelypodium laciniatum

formerly Thelypodium laciniatum var. streptanthoides

Flowers of Cut-leaf Thelypody, Thick-leaf Thelypody: Thelypodium laciniatum (formerly Thelypodium laciniatum var. streptanthoides)

The photo above shows a close-up of several flowers of thick-leaf thelypody (former var. streptanthoides) as seen from along state highway 17 at the north end of Soap Lake in central Washington............April 30, 2007.

Inflorescence of Cut-leaf Thelypody, Thick-leaf Thelypody: Thelypodium laciniatum (formerly Thelypodium laciniatum var. streptanthoides) The photo at right shows the densely flowered raceme of thick-leaf thelypody (former var. streptanthoides) as seen from along state highway 17 at the north end of Soap Lake in central Washington............April 30, 2007. Note the reddish sepals and thin, white petals.

Characteristics:

Thick-leaved Thelypody is a freely branched, upright biennial to 25 dm in height. The leaves are both basal and on the stems, with both being fairly thick and fleshy. The basal leaves are deeply lobed and ovate or deltoid-lanceolate in shape. The basal and lower stem leaves range from 10 to 45 cm long. The stem leaves are similar, but become ever-reduced in size, becoming more entire-margined as one proceeds up the stem.

The inflorescence is an elongated raceme, and may make up over one-half the height of the plant. Individual flowers consist of 4 sepals and 4 petals. Depending on the variety, flower color may be white to purplish. The seed capsules are siliques, long and thin, arranged either spreading or somewhat erect, and either straight or slightly arched.


Varieties of thick-leaf thelypody:

var. laciniatum: White sepals, siliques spreading (4 to 11 cm). Found from eastern Washington to Idaho, south to Nevada and California.

var. streptanthoides: Purple sepals, siliques spreading (6 to 14 cm). Found in central Washington and northern Oregon. See photo at right and below.

var. milleflorum: White sepals, siliques strongly ascending (3 to 6 cm). Found from along the Columbia River in central Washington south to Nevada and east to Idaho.


Habitat:

Thick-leaved Thelypody is found in desert regions, often in rock fall or cliff faces. It may commonly be found on the face of road cuts through basalt in the basin country.


Range:

Thick-leaved Thelypody is found across much of western North America.


Spreading fruit of Cut-leaf Thelypody, Thick-leaf Thelypody: Thelypodium laciniatum (formerly Thelypodium laciniatum var. streptanthoides)

The photo above shows a close-up of the long, linear fruit of thick-leaf thelypody (var. streptanthoides) as seen from along state highway 17 at the north end of Soap Lake in central Washington............April 30, 2007.

Cut-leaf Thelypody, Thick-leaf Thelypody: Thelypodium laciniatum (formerly Thelypodium laciniatum var. streptanthoides)

The photo above shows thick-leaf thelypody (var. streptanthoides) as seen from along state highway 17 at the north end of Soap Lake in central Washington............April 30, 2007.

Inflorescence of Cut-leaf Thelypody, Thick-leaf Thelypody: Thelypodium laciniatum (formerly Thelypodium laciniatum var. streptanthoides)

The photo above shows a close-up of raceme of thick-leaf thelypody (var. streptanthoides) as seen from along state highway 17 at the north end of Soap Lake in central Washington............April 30, 2007.

Cut-leaf Thelypody, Thick-leaf Thelypody: Thelypodium laciniatum (formerly Thelypodium laciniatum var. streptanthoides)

The photo above shows thick-leaf thelypody (var. streptanthoides) as seen from along state highway 17 at the north end of Soap Lake in central Washington............April 30, 2007.

Inflorescence of  Cut-leaf Thelypody, Thick-leaf Thelypody: Thelypodium laciniatum (formerly Thelypodium laciniatum var. streptanthoides) --Leaf of Cut-leaf Thelypody, Thick-leaf Thelypody: Thelypodium laciniatum (formerly Thelypodium laciniatum var. streptanthoides)

The 2 photos directly above show the reddish flowers and a stem leaf of Thelypodium laciniatum var. streptanthoides from Steamboat Rock State Park, central Washington, early May 1998.

Paul Slichter